On June 14, 2003, I took the YMCA Indoor Cycling Certification taught by Ray Salahuddin and Sean Dries. Here are the notes I took during class. For more details, refer to the Cycle Reebok training manual.

Getting on the Bike

It's worth mentioning the proper way to get on a bike because most people do it incorrectly. In case you're wondering, you're NOT supposed to step on one pedal and then swing your leg over! You may damage the bike (undue lateral stress on frame) or worse still, topple it over and hurt yourself and others. Instead, use the following method that's remarkably similar riding a real bike:

Point out how to operate the emergency stop mechanism in case a cyclist loses control.

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Posture & Form

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Why Cycle?

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Training Conditions

ACSM & YMCA guidelines

  1. Initial Conditioning
    • 60% max HR
    • 10-15 minutes, increasing to up to 20 minutes in a 4-6 week period
    • 3x/week
  2. Improvement Stage
    • Works on physiologically improving heart & lungs
    • Up to 85% max HR
    • 20-30 min duration, 3x/week, 4-5 months
  3. Maintenance
  4. Peak Performance
    • 90-95% max HR
    • High intensity, anaerobic
    • 1-2x/week (body needs recovery)

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Ways to Monitor Exertion

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Riding Elements and Cycling Techniques

There are a three basic ride elements: cadence (rate of pedaling, slow or fast), workload (amount of resistance, light or heavy), and position (seated or standing).

The various combinations of the three ride elements describe the different cycling techniques. For instance, Fast Light Seated means fast cadence, light resistance and seated position.

Resistance Level

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Basic Cycling Techniques

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Advanced Cycling Techniques

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Studio Cycling Drills

Adapted from "Cycle Reebok-The New Revolution" developed by Jeffrey Scott and Leigh Crews

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Teaching Tips

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What Makes a Great Instructor?

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Copyright 2003-2004 Lauren Wu. All Rights Reserved.